Judith M. Ford, PhD

Judith Ford, PhD
PhD, Stanford University
Professor, Department of Psychiatry, UCSF
Director of the CeNter for the StUdy of AdveRsiTy and CardiovascUlaR DiseasE (NURTURE), UCSF

Phone: (415) 221-4810 (ext. 4187)
Email: Judith.Ford@ucsf.edu

UCSF Profiles

Research Interests:

I have spent my entire academic career in a clinical department using brain imaging methods to ask clinical neuroscience questions about symptoms experienced by people with a variety of psychiatric conditions. My work has focused on neural activity and connectivity (1, 2) in clinical groups. Although my most recent work has focused on using fMRI methods to understand the neural basis of psychotic experience, I am well positioned to guide trainees in clinical neuroscience research. Moving across traditional psychiatric boundaries to study dimensions of behavior is familiar to me, and I welcome the opportunity to jump across traditional DSM diagnoses with trainees as we attempt to understand deficits in affect regulation regardless of the diagnosis (3).

Over my 40-year career as a clinical neuroscientist, I have mentored undergraduates, recent college graduates, graduate students, post-doctoral fellows, and junior faculty members in the laboratories of clinical and cognitive neuroscience at Stanford, Yale, and now UCSF. While at Yale, I led the VA Schizophrenia Biological Research Center, providing training, resources, and weekly Psychosis Journal Club for students, fellows, residents and faculty. At UCSF, I was program director of a T32 focused on neurobiology of schizophrenia. Outside of the university setting, I have served as a mentor for young investigators for the Society for Psychophysiological Research (SPR), American College of NeuroPsychopharmacology (ACNP), Biological Psychiatry (SOBP), and the International Congress on Schizophrenia Research (ICOSR). I serve on the Early Career Award Committee for SPR, on the Education Committee for ACNP, and on the Scientific Advisory Board of NARSAD charged with funding young investigators. As of 2016, with a fellow neuroscientist, I have assumed the leadership of the Young Investigator Award program for NARSAD. I take mentorship of young investigators seriously and look forward to mentoring trainees as part of this T32.

Professional Honors and Awards:

  • 1993-2000 Member, Board of Directors, Society for Psychophysiological Research (SPR)
  • 1994-2000 Associate Editor, Psychophysiology
  • 1997-1998 President, Society for Psychophysiological Research (SPR)
  • 1996-2006 Member, Review Board, Center for Scientific Review (BCDN-6, now NPAS)
  • 2001 Senior Career Contribution Award, EEG and Clinical Neuroscience Society
  • 2002, 2004, 2006 Senior Scientist Award, Biennial Winter Workshop on Schizophrenia in Davos
  • 2003 Member, American College of NeuropsychoPharmacology (ACNP)
  • 2004-2012 Member, Editorial Board, Schizophrenia Bulletin
  • 2005-2007 Member, Term Appointments and Promotions Committee, Yale University School of Medicine
  • 2005-2007 Member, Board of Directors, The Fellowship Place, New Haven, CT
  • 2005-present Editorial Board, International Journal of Psychophysiology
  • 2007-present Member, Editorial Board, Brain, Imaging and Behavior
  • 2008-present Credentials Committee ACNP (Co-Chair, 2011; Chair, 2012)
  • 2008 President, Psychiatric Research Society
  • 2007-2009 Member, Program Committee, Society of Biological Psychiatry
  • 2007-2010 Member, Early Career Award Committee (SPR)
  • 2009-present Member, VA Merit Review study section
  • 2009-present Scientific Advisory Board, NARSAD
  • 2009-present Editorial Board, Frontiers in Neuroscience
  • 2010 Distinguished Scientific Contributions to Psychophysiology (SPR)
  • 2012-2015 Editorial Board, NeuroImage (Clinical)
  • 2014-present Board of Directors, International Organization of Psychophysiology 2015-present Elected, Council, Society of Biological Psychiatry

Selected Publications:

  1. Ford JM, Palzes VA, Roach BJ, Mathalon DH. Did I do that? Abnormal predictive processes in schizophrenia when button pressing to deliver a tone. Schizophrenia bulletin. 2014;40(4):804-12.
  2. Wang J, Mathalon DH, Roach BJ, Reilly J, Keedy SK, Sweeney JA, Ford JM. Action planning and predictive coding when speaking. NeuroImage. 2014;91:91-8.
  3. Ford JM, Mathalon DH. Anticipating the future: automatic prediction failures in schizophrenia. International journal of psychophysiology : official journal of the International Organization of Psychophysiology. 2012;83(2):232-9.
  4. Ford JM, Roach BJ, Miller RM, Duncan CC, Hoffman RE, Mathalon DH. When it's time for a change: failures to track context in schizophrenia. International journal of psychophysiology : official journal of the International Organization of Psychophysiology. 2010;78(1):3-13.
  5. Ford JM, Mathalon DH, Heinks T, Kalba S, Faustman WO, Roth WT. Neurophysiological evidence of corollary discharge dysfunction in schizophrenia. The American journal of psychiatry. 2001;158:2069-71.
  6. Ford JM, Mathalon DH, Whitfield S, Faustman WO, Roth WT. Reduced communication between frontal and temporal lobes during talking in schizophrenia. Biological psychiatry. 2002;51(6):485-92.
  7. Ford JM, Gray M, Faustman WO, Roach BJ, Mathalon DH. Dissecting corollary discharge dysfunction in schizophrenia. Psychophysiology. 2007;44(4):522-9.
  8. Ford JM, Roach BJ, Mathalon DH. Assessing corollary discharge in humans using noninvasive neurophysiological methods. Nature protocols. 2010;5(6):1160-8.
  9. Heinks-Maldonado TH, Mathalon DH, Houde JF, Gray M, Faustman WO, Ford JM. Relationship of imprecise corollary discharge in schizophrenia to auditory hallucinations. Archives of general psychiatry. 2007;64(3):286-96.
  10. Ford JM, Mathalon DH, Whitfield S, Faustman WO, Roth WT. Reduced communication between frontal and temporal lobes during talking in schizophrenia. Biological psychiatry. 2002;51(6):485-92.
  11. Ford JM, Roach BJ, Faustman WO, Mathalon DH. Synch before you speak: auditory hallucinations in schizophrenia. The American journal of psychiatry. 2007;164(3):458-66.
  12. Ford JM, Roach BJ, Jorgensen KW, Turner JA, Brown GG, Notestine R, Bischoff-Grethe A, Greve D, Wible C, Lauriello J, Belger A, Mueller BA, Calhoun V, Preda A, Keator D, O'Leary DS, Lim KO, Glover G, Potkin SG, Fbirn, Mathalon DH. Tuning in to the voices: a multisite FMRI study of auditory hallucinations. Schizophrenia bulletin. 2009;35(1):58-66.
  13. Ford JM, Sullivan EV, Marsh L, White PM, Lim KO, Pfefferbaum A. The relationship between P300 amplitude and regional gray matter volumes depends upon the attentional system engaged. Electroencephalography and clinical neurophysiology. 1994;90(3):214-28.
  14. Pfefferbaum A, Rosenbloom M, Ford JM. Late event-related potential changes in alcoholics. Alcohol. 1987;4(4):275-81.
  15. Pfefferbaum A, Ford JM, White P, Mathalon D. Event-related potentials in alcoholic men: P3 amplitude reflects family history but not alcohol consumption. Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 1991;15(5):839-50.
  16. Mathalon DH, Whitfield SL, Ford JM. Anatomy of an error: ERP and fMRI. Biological psychology. 2003;64(1-2):119-41.
  17. Ford JM, Gray M, Whitfield SL, Turken AU, Glover G, Faustman WO, Mathalon DH. Acquiring and inhibiting prepotent responses in schizophrenia: event-related brain potentials and functional magnetic resonance imaging. Archives of general psychiatry. 2004;61(2):119-29.
  18. Mathalon DH, Jorgensen KW, Roach BJ, Ford JM. Error detection failures in schizophrenia: ERPs and FMRI. International journal of psychophysiology : official journal of the International Organization of Psychophysiology. 2009;73(2):109-17.
  19. Menon V, Ford JM, Lim KO, Glover GH, Pfefferbaum A. Combined event-related fMRI and EEG evidence for temporal-parietal cortex activation during target detection. Neuroreport. 1997;8(14):3029-37.